Hoof Brand

Hoof Brand Information

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This is a great brand for people to use during disaster seasons to put a telephone number on the hooves of the horse and by breeders who have many horses and do not want permanent identification. It is a great way to ID a horse for trailriders who travel with their horses. You never know when a horse will spook and run away. Once found the horse can be easily traced back to the owner with the right information on the hooves.

Hoof Branding is a form of hot iron branding and is not a permanent mark.  The owner's chosen information, such as phone number or zip code, is branded onto the horse's hooves, which is a painless process. Studies have also shown that, when properly applied, there is no long-term damage to the hoof wall. It is a safe method of temporary identification.

The postal code is often used in Australia and Europe which helps identify a horse to a specific area of the country.  This is a good method if identification for horse traders who do not want a lasting mark and  one that can be easily used for herd control.

The problems with this seem obvious when you first hear about this method. If the brand is left on too long there could be damage to the hoof. It only takes seconds to brand the hoof.

Can't see the brand in mud? A little water will fix that problem.

The continual hoof growth requires the brand to be re-applied  approximately every six months.  

When done properly this can be a very useful identification method.  This process is easily carried out by your farrier, who knows his hooves, two or three times a year.

UK Freeze-marking and hoof-branding - Freeze-marking for horses was introduced to Britain in 1978 and is recognized by the police, the RSPCA and the British Horse Society as an effective way of securing the identify of horses. Hoof-branding is recognized in the same way, but requires more maintenance. Both methods are regarded as safe and humane ways to property mark horses, but must be carried out by professionals

If you are interested in learning more contact Stolen Horse International at stolenhorse@netposse.com.  

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